Wednesday, November 25, 2020 – The Adventure of Software Testing Discovery

As the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact our daily lives, we are making our November KWality Talk available online for free.

Location: Online via this Zoom meeting link

Time: Stream will start at approximately 11:55 am. Meeting starts at 12:00 pm. Meeting ends at approximately 1:00 pm.

Speaker: Amal JEMAIYA

Topic: A Tester’s first time in Testing is like a human’s first time in the wild.

We are naturally inquisitive creatures, so when we are unsure of the best way forward, we grit our teeth and have the gumption to never stop asking questions.

When I first started in testing, big five questions came on my mind and it was by building answers for them that i understood how to get into it:

1- What’s out there?
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Metaphysics: what is the wild (testing domain) made of? What is the nature of whatever it is that exists? This includes everything from requirements, test cases, tools.. Before I started really testing, I passed a period only analysing other tester’s work. In this section I will illustrate how an analysis period can be beneficial for a tester.

2- How do I know what I know?
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Epistemology: How do I acquire knowledge? And how can i be sure of what I know? In this section I will illustrate how integrating testing communities offers important advantages to members, in fact a tester does not only need technical skills that they can learn individually, but also and most importantly needs to create links with different people regardless of the domain they work on.

3- What should I do?
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Ethics: what is right? What is wrong? What is the best way for testing? Hold on tight! Testing gets a whole lot trickier when we begin to ask about right and wrong actions, and does that change under certain circumstances?

4- What actions are permissible?
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Politics: How should testers be organised? What rights and responsibilities should testers have? Or not have? in this section I’ll illustrate how some wrong managerial practices of the distribution of power and resources may lead to lack of knowledge sharing, deep ignorance, lose of self esteem, and even worst, people leave their jobs if they don’t feel valued. I’ll also illustrate how communities of practice are essential to any agile organisation.

5- What can Testing be like?
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Aesthetics: what can be considered as good, attractive, efficient and an example to follow? Is it really in the eye of the beholder? This person deals with notions of efficiency and quality. In this section I will illustrate how culture, society and organisations influence our perception and understanding of these concepts.

Bio: Amal JEMAIYA is a software test and validation engineer in automotive domain, working with Primatec engineering. She is constantly participating in testing community activities. Amal studied Electronic systems and communication engineering and got specialized in Microelectronic systems and circuits. Her attention to details is the reason why she chose to be in Testing: “Testing is about caring for each detail that may affect the user”.

Continue ReadingWednesday, November 25, 2020 – The Adventure of Software Testing Discovery

Wednesday, October 28, 2020 – Teaching Testing with Exercises

As the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact our daily lives, we are making our October KWality Talk available online for free.

Location: Online via this Zoom meeting link

Time: Stream will start at approximately 11:55 am. Meeting starts at 12:00 pm. Meeting ends at approximately 1:00 pm.

Speaker: Matt Heusser

Topic: A lot of test education is PowerPoint. Yet we know that a disproportionate number of testers are tactile learners. We learn by doing, which is what makes many of us so good at exploration and discovery. This class involves actual testing. Participants are immersed in a simulation that includes time pressure, uncertainty, and conditions of ambiguity with evolving requirements. After sharing our bugs, we reflect on what we have learned, discuss as a group, then provide enough instructors’ notes for others to run the exercise with their own teams. We’ve been working on this simulation for a few years. We use it for job interviews and in training. Come learn how to demonstrate the value of testing, teach everyone some important lessons in testing, and maybe even learn a thing or two yourself.

Bio: As Managing Director of Excelon Development, Matt Heusser is arguably the single most prolific writer on software testing who is also a practitioner. The lead editor of “How To Reduce the Cost of Software Testing”, Matt is a co-author on “Save Our Scrum”, and was lead organizer of The Workshop on Self-Education in Software Testing, the Workshop on Teaching Test Design, and the Workshop on Technical Debt. His black-belt testing challenge inspired the Miagi-Do School of Software Testing in 2009.

Continue ReadingWednesday, October 28, 2020 – Teaching Testing with Exercises

Wednesday, September 30, 2020 – Queuing – A Deep Dive Into Common Performance Mysteries

As the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact our daily lives, we are making our September KWality Talk available online for free.

Location: This online meeting has ended

Time: Stream will start at approximately 11:55 am. Meeting starts at 12:00 pm. Meeting ends at approximately 1:00 pm.

Speaker: Nicola Gordon and Ioan Matei

Topic: Software performance issues can often be attributed to large or growing resource queues. The primary goal of this presentation will be to enable participants to identify and reduce queuing bottlenecks in their application.

We’ll touch on Little’s Law, show visuals of what this looks like conceptually, and view some graphs that illustrate how queuing manifests as end user response, and CPU usage. By now, our audience will know that us performance engineers are a little obsessed with graphs. But hold onto your seats fellow testers – check out the hockey stick effect and the graphs that solve the mystery – it’ll blow your mind!

Bio: Nicola Gordon is a performance engineer at D2L. Software performance KPIs are her North Star, but check out the trenches on any given day and you’ll find she loves to read a good graph, to tackle a good performance mystery, and to find creative solutions to complex performance challenges. For this presentation, Nicola will be joined by Ioan Matei, her colleague at D2L who is also a performance engineer.

Continue ReadingWednesday, September 30, 2020 – Queuing – A Deep Dive Into Common Performance Mysteries

Wednesday, April 29, 2020 – Visual Differential Testing: The Good, The Bad, and The Different

As the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact our daily lives, we are making our April KWality Talk available online for free.

Location: Online via this Zoom meeting link

Time: Stream will start at approximately 11:45 am. Meeting starts at 12:00 pm. Meeting ends at approximately 1:00 pm.

Speaker: Mark Weiss

Topic: If it’s said a picture is worth a thousand words, could a screenshot detect a thousand defects? This is a talk around a much lesser known type of test automation. This testing goes by many different names, but one of the most common is Visual Differential Testing, or Visual Diff for short. It is the act of using screen captures and comparisons to find unexpected changes. In this talk, we’ll follow Mark Weiss’ experiences exploring Visual Diff testing of a web app. We’ll start the journey from its very beginning. What caused him to explore Visual Diff testing? Why’d he build his own framework? What are the pitfalls of doing so? This will be done by going through each iteration of his homegrown implementation and seeing the many mistakes and the many wins it has provided. By the end, you’ll hopefully know if Visual Diff testing is right for you and be able implement a version of it while avoiding many costly mistakes.

Bio: Mark Weiss is a Senior Test Developer obsessed with making testing simpler. With a background in Computer Science and over 11 years of software development experience, Mark has developed, tested, and supported software from all facets of the software life cycle. Mark’s ability to learn a product through and through and understand how people use it, has allowed him to excel in his career. He’s passionate about automating the simple things and diving head first and figuring out the complex things. With an intuitive and creative mind, he’s always looking for new challenges and inventing new tools to make testing better.

Continue ReadingWednesday, April 29, 2020 – Visual Differential Testing: The Good, The Bad, and The Different

Wednesday, February 26, 2020 – Heroes are Expensive: Extinguishing the Firefighting Culture

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Speaker: Sue Johnston

Topic: Does your organization rely on heroes to complete your products and projects? Fueled by pizza, coffee and who knows what else, they work all hours, flat out, giving 110% to meet that critical release date. Sometimes they do it week after week. It isn’t pretty. It isn’t smart. And it isn’t agile.

In this session, you’ll explore ideas that aim to prevent that unsustainable and costly scenario and create environments where people can contribute their best work without extraordinary measures.

In her work as a trainer of agile practitioners, Sue has a view of agile life through the eyes of Testers, Scrum Masters, Team Leads, Agile Coaches, Product Owners and other technical professionals. She sees a pattern that gets in the way of team productivity, effective work and project success. It’s the gap between the expectations organizational leaders hold – or were sold – and what’s possible under the circumstances. (Twice the work in half the time, anyone?)

Changing those circumstances is the role of agile leaders. While few still believe, “install Scrum, fill up Jira and you’re agile,” there remains an apparent belief that agility is the responsibility of the development teams, alone. For everyone else, it’s business as usual and that leads organizations to to demand and reward heroic behaviour, which leads to quality slips, burnout and interpersonal drama.

In this session, as an agile leader, you’ll examine this challenge and explore what you might do about it. We’ll create some realistic expectations, based on the patterns of effective teamwork.

Bio: Sue Johnston helps you talk so people listen, listen so people talk and change the world one conversation at a time. After a career as a reporter, she moved to corporate communication, where she was involved in large scale change initiatives and technology implementations (including an early Extreme Programming project) at two of Canada’s financial services giants. She came to believe the crucial communication in organizations is the interaction between people. A professional coach since 2003, Sue has trained hundreds of people in coaching and facilitation techniques. Her workshops are accredited by ICAgile. Based in Waterloo, Ontario, she is the author of “Talk To Me: Workplace Conversations That Work,” the founder of It’s Understood Communication and a partner in Leanintuit. She has lots of letters after her name, but what really matters are letters like this: “Sue is the coach you want to learn from!” You can learn more about Sue and her work at https://itsunderstood.com.

Time: Doors open at approximately 11:30 am. Announcements and discussion start at approximately 11:50 am. Meeting ends at approximately 1:00 pm.

Lunch: provided on a first-come, first-served basis

Location: University of Waterloo, William G. Davis Computer Research Centre, Room DC1302

Maps and directions: See https://uwaterloo.ca/about/how-find-us/maps-and-directions

Continue ReadingWednesday, February 26, 2020 – Heroes are Expensive: Extinguishing the Firefighting Culture

Wednesday, January 29, 2020 – Quality Starts With a Shared Understanding

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Speaker: Jeff Kosciejew

Topic: Using the game “Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes”, we’ll explore and highlight the importance and impact solid teamwork, communication, and creating & developing a shared language, can have on any project or product. Likely different from any other workshop, this really dives into the importance of creating the conditions for success when working with others. This is an interactive session will directly involve a small group actively participating with other observing. However there will be multiple rounds to allow anyone and everyone who wants to participate. And in doing so, we’ll get to see the impact this has on the success of the activity.

Bio: Jeff combines his practical experience in delivering projects and building products from a range of industries with a passion for helping people thrive and grow. He excels at teaching complicated ideas and thrives when facilitating any size of team or group, at all levels of an organization. He combines coaching, mentoring, and teaching to meet people where they are today, and help them along their journey to achieve results that are important and meaningful to them. He employs a diverse range of approaches, techniques, and practices from a variety of frameworks and methods to help make meaningful impacts on the outcomes of work. Taking a systems-thinking approach, Jeff has a proven track record in helping individuals, teams, and organizations identify and implement improvements, not to create great outcomes, but rather to help nudge and evolve the environment where great outcomes are inevitable. Jeff has taught a Project Management module at college, designed, developed, and delivered workshops for small to enterprise companies, and consulted at all levels throughout organizations as an Agile Coach, Product Owner, Scrum Master, and Business Analyst. He’s got a number of industry certifications, but finds his actual experience to be more valuable and meaningful. Jeff finds it amusing to write about himself in the third person.

Time: Doors open at approximately 11:30 am. Announcements and discussion start at approximately 11:50 am. Meeting ends at approximately 1:00 pm.

Lunch: provided on a first-come, first-served basis

Location:
University of Waterloo,
William G. Davis Computer Research Centre,
Room DC1302

Maps and directions: See https://uwaterloo.ca/about/how-find-us/maps-and-directions

Continue ReadingWednesday, January 29, 2020 – Quality Starts With a Shared Understanding

Wednesday, November 27, 2019 – The Secret Life of Automation

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Speaker: Michael Bolton

Topic: The Web is abuzz with talk about “automated testing” and “test automation”. Automation comes with a tasty and digestible story: eliminate “manual testing”, and replace messy, complex humanity with reliable, fast, efficient robots! Yet there are many secrets hidden between the lines of the story.

Automation encourages people to think of mechanizable assembly-line work done on the factory floor, but neither development nor the testing within it is like that. Testing is a part of the creative and critical work that happens in design studios, inventors’ workshops, and research labs. Although they can be assisted by tools, those kinds of work are neither “manual” nor “automated”.

User and tester actions can be simulated, but users and testers cannot be replicated in software. Automated checking does exist, but it cannot do the testing. While tools can help us, we must not lose sight of the important skilled work that people must do to use tools wisely and powerfully.

In this talk, Michael Bolton will reveal secrets about automation that people do not usually consider, disclose or discuss. He’ll present a vision for using tools effectively—one that puts the tester at the centre of testing work and the testing mission: finding problems that threaten the value of our products and our projects.

Bio: Michael Bolton is a consulting software tester and testing teacher who helps people to solve testing problems that they didn’t realize they could solve. In 2006, he became co-author (with James Bach) of Rapid Software Testing (RST), a methodology and mindset for testing software expertly and credibly in uncertain conditions and under extreme time pressure. Since then, he has flown over a million miles to teach RST in 35 countries on six continents.

Michael has over 25 years of experience testing, developing, managing, and writing about software. For the last 20 years, he has led DevelopSense, a Toronto-based testing and development consultancy. Prior to that, he was with Quarterdeck Corporation for eight years, during which he managed the company’s flagship products and directed project and testing teams both in-house and around the world.

Contact Michael at michael@developsense.com, on Twitter @michaelbolton, or through his Web site, http://www.developsense.com.

Time: Doors open at approximately 11:30 am. Announcements and discussion start at approximately 11:50 am. Meeting ends at approximately 1:00 pm.

Lunch: provided on a first-come, first-served basis

Location:
University of Waterloo,
William G. Davis Computer Research Centre,
Room DC1302

Maps and directions: See https://uwaterloo.ca/about/how-find-us/maps-and-directions

Continue ReadingWednesday, November 27, 2019 – The Secret Life of Automation

Wednesday, October 30, 2019 – Reality Driven Testing

Speaker: Rob Sabourin

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Topic: Many agile teams rework previously deployed stories, even after plenty of in-sprint testing. Well groomed, refined, stories framed with typical, alternate and error scenarios, gracefully described in well formed gherkin, continue to encounter all sorts of bugs. Software engineering consultant, Rob Sabourin, often sees rework in over 20% of deployed stories. In this presentation Rob shows how agile teams can drive rework down dramatically, often achieving near Zero rework after a story is DONE. Rob teaches teams to identify and implement relevant testing activities above and beyond those derived from well formed requirements. Rob shows agile team members how to identify tests based on reality. He seeks out relevant testing ideas based on what is really being changed in the technological solution. He finds ideas based on what the user really does in the workplace and he discovers rich test ideas based on the real target environments. Delegates learn many excellent strategies to identify, prioritize, and implement reality driven testing. They will ferret out important bugs that really matter eliminating the need for downstream rework.

Bio: Robert Sabourin, P.Eng. has more than 37 years management experience leading teams of software development professionals to consistently deliver projects on-time, on-quality and on-budget. As a respected member of the software engineering community, Robert has trained and mentored literally thousands of top professionals in the field. Robert is an Adjunct Professor of Software Engineering at McGill University who often speaks to conferences around the world on software engineering, Software Quality Assurance, testing and management issues.

Time: Doors open at approximately 11:30 am. Announcements and discussion start at approximately 11:50 am. Meeting ends at approximately 1:00 pm.

Lunch: provided on a first-come, first-served basis

Location:
University of Waterloo,
William G. Davis Computer Research Centre,
Room DC1302

Maps and directions: See https://uwaterloo.ca/about/how-find-us/maps-and-directions

Continue ReadingWednesday, October 30, 2019 – Reality Driven Testing

Wednesday, May 29, 2019 – Measuring Quality: Take Your Escaped Defects Count and Stuff It

Speaker: James Spere

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Topic: Managers are weird – they like to have metrics on everything. The same is true for product quality. So how do you measure quality? If you’re looking for how to track escaped defect counts and testing find rates, this isn’t the talk for you. I’ll take you through how to start with the customer and work your way backwards – measuring the things that actually impact them. Find out the 2 measurements that really matter, how to actually track them and strategies for enabling your entire company to enable the changes required to really move the quality needle.

Bio: Over his career, James Spere has continually built strong connections between his development teams and customer support, sales and clients with a customer-first approach to software development, deployment, and communication. James uses an open and honest style that has enabled these strong partnerships across multiple industries which he hopes to share during this session.

Continue ReadingWednesday, May 29, 2019 – Measuring Quality: Take Your Escaped Defects Count and Stuff It

Wednesday, May 1, 2019 – KWSQA/LAST Collaboration

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Topic: Collaboration with Lansing Area Software Testers (LAST)

Have you got a tough problem at work that you haven’t been able to solve yet? Feel like you could use some fresh perspectives? Then this is the meeting for you!

This month KWSQA teams up with LAST to provide a unique collaborative test clinic. Bring your toughest testing problems to share and draw on the talent and experience of two regions of software quality professionals!

We will provide a video conference link and an online platform (Google Docs) to collaborate. Bring your phone and/or laptop to participate online or just bring yourself to video chat and try to solve those gnarliest of testing problems!

Bio: LAST is dedicated to furthering the software testing community. We do this in a variety of ways by organizing monthly meetups to discuss software testing techniques, experiences, trends and more. The format of our meetups range from Lean Coffee style, presentations, workshops and social meetups.

Continue ReadingWednesday, May 1, 2019 – KWSQA/LAST Collaboration